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Welcome to the KU Environmental History Program

The University of Kansas is one of the leading institutions in the world to study environmental history. Donald Worster, one of the earliest and most prominent environmental historians, began building the program when he joined the faculty in 1989. Kansas soon became known for attracting scholars from around the world, promoting first-rate research and teaching, and building a strong community of students and alumni. Read more about Professor Worster and the program's history.  

Today, departmental faculty include Greg Cushman, Andrew Denning, Steven Epstein, Sara Gregg, and Paul Kelton. They synthesize environmental history with United States, Native American, Latin American, medieval, global, technological, and agricultural history, as well as with the history of biology. They have strong ties to faculty with related interests from around the university, including members of the Environmental Studies Program and participants in the Nature and Culture Seminar at the Hall Center for the Humanities.  

Kansas has long attracted superb graduate students, and the faculty works closely with students in and outside the classroom, training students in the full range of professional skills (in teaching, publishing, etc.) as well as research expertise. 

The program enjoys one of the best placement records in the field, with alumni landing tenure track and research jobs around the world. Research prizes won by alumni include the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for the best first book in American history (it was a revised Kansas dissertation). Two Kansas Ph.D.s have served as editor-in-chief of Environmental History, the leading journal in the field. The sense of community developed in Lawrence creates a strong network of alumni that lives on at international conferences.

We encourage applications from potential graduate students interested in the environmental history of any period or place. Dissertation committees frequently include members whose expertise (in regions, periods, and other disciplines) complements that of the environmental historians. All potential applicants should contact individual faculty members before applying in order to discuss their interests. 

Program History

By Donald Worster

The first course offerings specifically designated as “environmental history” began at the University of Kansas in spring 1990, following Donald Worster’s arrival as Hall Distinguished Professor of American History. He had grown up in the state and graduated from the university, before undertaking doctoral studies at Yale and then teaching in New England and Hawaii. But before his arrival the university had been home to a couple of great historians interested in environment and energy issues.

James C. Malin

James C. Malin

First was James Malin, a member of the university faculty from 1921 to 1963. Born in North Dakota in the late 19th century, he moved at an early age with his parents to western Kansas, where he grew up. All his degrees were conferred by Kansas institutions, and he lived in the state continuously until his death in 1979. During his career Malin served as president of the Agricultural History Society, the Kansas State Historical Society, and the Kansas History Teachers Association. His writings included The Grassland of North America and a number of essays posthumously collected into the book History and Ecology: Studies of the Grassland.

Overlapping Malin’s and Worster’s years was John G. Clark, a New Yorker who earned his Ph.D. at Stanford under the guidance of David Potter. Clark’s main specialty was 19th-century economic history. But in the late 1980s he changed direction, serving for a while as a historian in the U.S. Department of Energy and writing a book from that experience: Energy and the Federal Government: Fossil Fuel Polices, 1900-1946 and The Political Economy of World Energy: A Twentieth-Century Perspective. He also became advisory editor for a monograph series on western natural resources published by the University Press of Kansas and served as director of the Environmental Studies Program.

Following his retirement, Clark was replaced on the faculty by Karl Brooks, who earned degrees in both law and history and who taught in both History and Environmental Studies. He left the university to become Regional Director of the Environmental Protection Agency. William Tsutsui, now Dean of Arts and Sciences at Southern Methodist University, was for many years another member of the core faculty in environmental history, with special expertise on Asia and Japan.

Today the faculty are numerous and outstanding, including Gregory Cushman, Sara Gregg, Paul Kelton, and Steven Epstein. Dozens of graduate students, from across the United States and many foreign countries, have gone through the program, and thousands of undergraduates have enrolled its course offerings. Few institutions anywhere can show such a record of faculty and student engagement in environmental history. Perhaps there is something in the prairie wind that has brought so many to this place to write and think about the human relationship with the earth over time.

 

Environmental Historians at KU

The University of Kansas has a long tradition in the practice of Environmental History. Currently, scholars and students teach and research a wide breadth of topics ranging from Easter Island to the Polar World and from the Medieval Era to the Present. Alumni have gone on to teach at institutions across the US and the World as well as work in governmental organizations and non-profit institutions.
Faculty
- Gregory T. Cushman: Latin America since 1450, history of science and technology, global history
- Andrew S. Denning: Twentieth-century Europe, particularly Germany and France; mobility studies; environmental history; history of technology; leisure and consumption; transnationalism; empire and global history
- Steven A. Epstein: Medieval Europe, Italy, economic, and social history
- Sara Gregg: 19th and 20th century US, agriculture, land use, environmental policy
- Paul Kelton: Indigenous Peoples, early America, disease
- Donald Worster: Professor emeritus of environmental history
Graduate Students
- Nicholas Cunigan: Early Modern Atlantic World, Climate Change, and indigenous peoples 
- Harley Davidson: Early Modern Spain
- Steve Davis:
- Andrew Kustodowicz: Early Modern/Modern Japan, Sport Fishing
- Ariel LaGue:
- Brandon Luedtke: 18th-20th Century US, transnational
- Amber Roberts: Early Modern Britain, Equestrianism
- Brian Rumsey: 20th century US, Flood Insurance, Climate Change
- Jared S. Taber: 19th and 20th century US, Flooding
- Patrick J. Klinger: British Atlantic World, Weather and Climate during the 17th and 18th Centuries
- Ximena Sevilla: Latin America, Amazonia, 16th to 18th centuries, Indigenous peoples, Colonialism
Alumni
KU degree completion date in parentheses
Adam Rome: (1996) Professor and Unidel Helen Gouldner Chair for the Environment, University of Delaware
Brian Black: (1996) Division Head and Professor, Penn State Altoona
James A. Pritchard: (1996) Adjunct Associate Professor, Iowa State University
Sterling Evans: (1997) Louise Welsh Chair in Oklahoma, Southern Plains and Borderlands History, University of Oklahoma
Paul Sutter: (1997) Associate Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder
Karl Brooks: (2000) Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of Administration and Resources Management,  Environmental Protection Agency
Lisa Brady: (2003) Associate Professor, Boise State University
- Maril Hazlett: (2003) Digital Writing and Environmental Communications, Content Solutions LLC
Frank Zelko: (2003) Associate Professor of History and Environmental Studies, University of Vermont
Jay Antle: (2003) Professor and Director, Center for Sustainability at Johnson County Community College
Dale Nimz: (2003) Executive Director, Kansas Preservation Alliance Inc. 
Kevin C. Armitage: (2004) Associate Professor, Miami University in Ohio 
Kent A. Curtis: (2006) Assistant Professor, Ohio State University, Mansfield
Brian Drake: (2006) Senior Lecturer, University of Georgia
Mark Hersey: (2006) Associate Professor, Mississippi State University
Robb Campbell: (2006) Associate Professor of History and Geography, Black Hills State University
Jerry Frank: (2008) Associate Professor, University of Missouri
- Shen Hou: (2008) Assistant Professor, Renmin University of China in Beijing
Daniel Kerr: (2010) (American Studies) Instructor, West Texas A&M University
- Tom Arnold: (2012) Instructor, Black Hills State University
- Neil Oatsvall: (2013) Instructor, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences, and the Arts
María Gabriela Torres Montero: (2014) Research Professor, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Mexico
- Alex Boynton: (2015) Instructor University of Kansas
- Shelby Callaway: (2015) U.S. Department of Education
- Joshua Nygren: (2015) Assistant Professor, University of Central Missouri
- Adam Sundberg: (2015) Assistant Professor, Creighton University
Environmental History Courses

The University of Kansas History faculty are committed to instruction in environmental history, and each semester offer a range of courses in the field, across geographic and temporal boundaries.  The following courses are offered on a regular rotation, supplemented often by special topics courses in related topics.


HIST 103 Environment and History
Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as EVRN 103.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 140 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change
This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 140 and GEOG 140.) LEC.
Fall 2017
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Cushman, Gregory
Vanderveen, Cornelis
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM JRP 150 - LAWRENCE
5 18514
LBN Brox, Ali
Cushman, Gregory
Vanderveen, Cornelis
F 09:00-10:50 AM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 21771
LBN Klinger, Patrick
Tu 11:00-12:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 20130
LBN Cooper, David
W 11:00-12:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 20132
LBN Klinger, Patrick
Th 11:00-12:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 20133
LBN Cooper, David
W 01:00-02:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 20131


HIST 142 Global Environment II: The Ecology of Human Civilization
This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory sections survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 142 and GEOG 142) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.



HIST 336 Ethics, Ideas, and Nature
This course examines the ethical frameworks developed for thinking about, using, and protecting the natural world. Examples of topics include indigenous approaches to nature, the history of ecological ideas, environmental movements, the role of the state of managing resources, utilitarianism and progressivism, environmental lawmaking, wilderness advocacy, nature and theology, the rights of nature, and environmental justice. Students are introduced to the theories of duty ethics, justice ethics, utilitarianism, and right ethics, and required to apply ethical decision making to contemporary and historical environmental issues. Multiple perspectives on the history of human interactions with nature demonstrate the importance of reflecting upon the value systems inherent in human-centered environmental ethics and nature-centered environmental ethics. (Same as EVRN 336.) LEC.
Fall 2017
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Caminero-Santangelo, Byron
Luedtke, Brandon
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM LEA 2112 - LAWRENCE
3 22355
LEC Hurst, Jennifer
Boynton, Alex
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 24790
LEC Boynton, Alex
Davis, Steven
MW 01:00-02:15 PM ROB 252 - LAWRENCE
3 26683

HIST 347 Environmental History of North America
A survey of changes in the landscape and in people's perceptions of the natural world from 1500 to present. Topics include agroecology, water and energy, the impact of capitalism, industrialism, urbanization, and such technologies as the automobile, and the origins of conservation. (Same as EVRN 347.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 365 Invention of the Tropics
This course surveys the history of the tropical environment and its peoples from Europe's first encounter to today's ecotourism boom. It focuses on portrayals of the tropics in historical travel accounts and films. Through these sources, we seek to understand how science, technology, and tourism have been used, in turn, as instruments of progress and destruction, tools of empire and national liberation. Case studies are drawn from Latin America, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 562 United States Environmental History in the 20th Century
Americans dramatically changed the natural world between 1900 and 2000. This course asks how transformed environments shaped the American experience during a century of technological innovation, democratic renewal, economic expansion, global conflict, and cultural pluralism. Topics include food and markets, energy and transportation, law and politics, protest and resistance, suburbanization, and environmentalism's fate in a global information era. (Same as EVRN 562.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 563 U.S
Explores both leading and dissident ideas that Americans have had about the natural world since 1900. Broad chronological periods are explored in some depth, including the Progressive Era, New Deal, Cold War, the Sixties, and the Reagan Eighties. The course uses articles and books, as well as visual and aural forms of communication. Commercial speech, as well as scholarly and literary works, are considered. (Same as EVRN 563.) Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or HIST 129, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 591 Food in History: West and East
A survey of scholarship on food in the West and in East Asia, choosing works primarily by historians, but also by sociologists, geographers, and anthropologists. We consider how scholars have approached issues concerning food productions and consumption, what habits of eating reveal about daily life, and how and when food is embedded with historiography related to these topics, keeping in mind the famous maxim of the noted French gastronome Brillat-Savarin (d. 1826): "Tell me what you eat: I will tell you what you are. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 636 Agriculture in World History
A survey of the development of agriculture from prehistory through the present. The major themes of the course will be how various methods of farming have spread around the world, how new techniques have transformed agriculture, and how peasants and farmers have interacted with cities and governments. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 879 Colloquium on North American Environmental History
Intensive survey of significant works in the field from colonial times to the present, with attention to bibliography, research methods and needs, and leading issues in interpretation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


HIST 981 Seminar in Environment and History
An inquiry into major issues and methods in environmental history, viewed from both an American and modern world perspective. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.

Funding

In addition to general funding opportunities available to all graduate students, the interdisciplinary nature of environmental history opens up a broad range of funding opportunities not typically available to humanities scholars. Below you will find a list of non-traditional funding sources for which environmental history students might be eligible.

National Science Foundation
Pivot/Community of Science (COS) Funding Opportunities Database
Environmental Studies GTA Fellowship
American Meteorological Society 
Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Fellowships & Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipends
Mellon ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships
Ford Foundation Fellowship Program
Newberry Library ASEH Fellowship
Mellon Fellowship for Dissertation Research in Original Sources
Research Opportunities
 
The University of Kansas and the surrounding region are home to several excellent centers for research. Listed below are some of the most frequently used resources for KU and regionally specific research. A more complete list can be found here.
 
University of Kansas
Regional Research
 
Research Assistance
Organizations & Interdisciplinary Collaboration

The University of Kansas faculty and graduate students are involved in a variety of collaborations:  within professional organizations, academic publishing, and in interdisciplinary research.  A crucial part of our work is to reach out beyond the classroom, and inform a broader historical perspective on the relationship between nature & culture.
 
Professional Organizations
Journals
Interdisciplinary Collaborations

Gallery

Rachel Carson Center

The University of Kansas department of History operates a mutual exchange program with the Rachel Carson Center in Munich. Through this program, KU students can conduct research and participate in scholarly seminars in Munich, while students from the Rachel Carson Center can do the same in Lawrence.

Brownbag Calendar

The Environmental History Brownbag meets weekly during the fall and spring semesters. A collaborative meeting between graduate students and faculty, it fosters intellectual community, professional development, and writing support through a varied calendar of activities.

For the 2106-2017 year, meetings will be held on Tuesdays at 11:30 am - 12:30 pm except for during the weeks of the Nature and Culture seminar at the Hall Center for the Humanities. Meetings are held in the history department conference room (3659) on the 3rd floor of Wescoe Hall.

Meeting Date
Introductions
30 August, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Department of History Inclusive Teaching seminar in place of weekly Brownbag Meeting

Faculty

6 September, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Conferences and Elevator Pitches

Brandon Leudtke

13 September, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Article Discussion

PJ Klinger

20 September, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Housekeeping and Website Discussion

PJ Klinger and Amber Roberts Graham

27 September, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
CVs and Resumes

Amber Roberts Graham will discuss some of the differences between the two documents before the group workshops each others' CVs and resumes.

4 October, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Fall Break/Nature and Culture week

There will be no meeting this week - please attend the Nature and Culture seminar.

11 October, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Dissertation Chapter(s)

PJ Klinger and/or Amber Roberts Graham will solicit feedback on their dissertation chapters.

18 October, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Field Trip

Brandon Luedtke will lead a field trip to the Prairie Acre.

25 October, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Grant Writing

TBD

1 November, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Nature and Culture week

There will be no meeting this week - please attend the Nature and Culture seminar.

10 November, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Professional Presentations

TBD

15 November, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Wen's Master's Thesis

Wen will present her master's research for discussion and feedback.

22 November, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Article Discussion

Steve Davis

29 November, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Nature and Culture week

There will be no meeting this week - please attend the Nature and Culture seminar.

6 December, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659
Topic TBD

Wrap-up meeting for the semester

13 December, 2016
11:30 - 12:30
Wescoe 3659

Brownbag Archive

The Environmental History Brownbag meets weekly during the fall and spring semesters. A collaborative meeting between graduate students and faculty, it fosters intellectual community, professional development, and writing support through a varied calendar of activities.

Meeting Date
Introductions
1 September, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Website Revisions

PJ Klinger and Andrew Kustodowicz

8 September, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Internships

Brian Rumsey

15 September, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Summer Research Summaries

Annka Liepold and Ximena Sevilla

15 September, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Discussion: Breeding Dissent

Amber Roberts Graham will discuss her most recent conference paper and solicit feedback concerning how it may be developed toward a dissertation chapter.

29 September, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Dissertation Prospectus

Steve Davis will solicit feedback on his dissertation prospectus.

6 October, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Fall Break

There will be no meeting this week.

13 October, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Wes Jackson Lecture at The Commons

Wes Jackson, founder and President of the Land Institute, will deliver a public lecture on "Ecological Agriculture for an Ecological Civilization". The event is free and open to the public, but you must register for tickets here.

15 October, 2015
6:00-7:30 pm
The Commons, Spooner Hall
Dissertation Prospectus

PJ Klinger will solicit feedback on his dissertation prospectus.

20 October, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Grant Proposal Draft

Brandon Luedtke will circulate a draft of a grant application for feedback.

27 October, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Rhonda Houser (GIS and Data Specialist—KU Libraries) will be coming in to talk about the potentialities of GIS, and its uses for historians.

3 November, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Professional Essay

Ximena Sevilla will solicit feedback on her Professional Essay.

10 November, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
CANCELLED: Archival Research Debrief

Steve Davis and Brandon Leudtke will share their recent experiences conducting research in several archives.

17 November, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Thanksgiving Week

There will be no meeting this week.

24 November, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Writing Syllabi

We will discuss strategies for developing courses and writing syllabi. Please bring any syllabi you have written or ones that you think are good models.

1 December, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
Writing Lectures

We will discuss strategies for writing successful lectures. Please prepare a few questions you'd like to consider in this context. For example, we might discuss how to encourage active learning during lectures, or strategies for writing lectures efficiently when you are developing new courses.

8 December, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4034
First Spring Meeting

We will take some time to catch each other up on progress made during the fall semester and winter break. We will also spend some time scheduling the spring sessions, so please bring ideas for a meeting or two.

26 January, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
No Meeting

We will not meet this week. Students are encouraged to begin reading Shrinking the Earth in preparation for the meeting on 16 February.

2 February, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Dissertation Prospectus

Steve Davis will circulate a revised version of his dissertation prospectus and invite discussion and feedback.

9 February, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Conference Presentation

Jared Taber will deliver the presentation he is preparing for a conference in March and invite discussion and feedback.

16 February, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Guest Speaker: Donald Worster

Distinguished Professor Emeritus Donald Worster will join us for a discussion of his recent book, Shrinking the Earth: The Rise and Decline of American Abundance.

23 February, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Professional Essay

PJ Klinger will circulate his professional essay and invite discussion and feedback.

1 March, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Topic TBD

Brandon Luedtke will lead a discussion on a topic of his choosing.

8 March, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Spring Break

There will be no meeting this week.

15 March, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Topic TBD

Ximena Sevilla will lead a discussion on a topic of her choosing.

22 March, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
2015 Leopold-Hidy Prize-Winning Article

The group will meet to discuss the distinguishing characteristics of the 2015 winner of the Leopold-Hidy prize for the best article in Environmental History. The article was written by Faisal Husain, a Ph.D. Candidate at Georgetown University. You may find the article here.

29 March, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
ASEH Debrief

The Environmental History faculty, and any students who attended the ASEH annual meeting in March, will offer their perspectives on the meeting and trends in the field over the past year.

5 April, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Article Discussion

Andrew Kustodowicz will lead a discussion over the introduction to Jen Brown's book, Trout Cultures: How Fly Fishing Forever Changed the Rocky Mountain West (2015).

12 April, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
2016 Leopold-Hidy Prize-Winning Article

The group will meet to discuss the distinguishing characteristics of the 2016 winner of the Leopold-Hidy prize for the best article in Environmental History, and compare it with the 2015 winning article. The prize winner will be announced at the 2016 meeting of ASEH at the end of March.

19 April, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Guest Speaker: Research Presentation by Leif Fredrickson, UVA

Ph.D. Candidate Leif Fredrickson, UVA, will meet with the group to present and discuss his dissertation research.

26 April, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Reading Discussion

The group will meet to discuss Robert Michael Morrissey's article, ``The Power of the Ecotone: Bison, Slavery, and the Rise and Fall of the Grand Village of the Kaskaskia,'' Journal of American History 102 (3): 667-92. You may find the article here.

3 May, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
Wescoe 4033
Book and Research Presentation

Professor Ian Smith (Environmental Ethics, Washburn) will present his research and recent book, The Intrinsic Value of Endangered Species. You can find his book abstract here.

10 May, 2016
12:00-1:00 pm
We will convene for this capstone session at an off-campus location (TBD) offering refreshments.

EH News & Awards

  • Sara Gregg and Paul Kelton received the Louise Byrd Graduate Educator Award for their service in graduate advising in April, 2015.
  • Gregory Cushman named one of first Carnegie fellows for social sciences and humanities
  • Environmental historian Andrew Denning recently accepted a position at KU to become a new assistant professor of European History in March, 2015.
  • Gregory Cushman received the University Scholarly Achievement Award from the University of Kansas in March, 2015
  • Adam Sundberg published his article "Claiming the Past: History, Memory, and Innovation following the Christmas Flood of 1717" in the journal Environmental History in Spring, 2015.
  • Alex Boynton defended his dissertation, "Freedom, Tradition, Environmentalism?: Anti-Environmentalism and the Transformation of Conservative Thought in the 1970s" with honors. 
  • Adam Sundberg defended his dissertation, "Floods, Worms, and Cattle Plague: Nature-induced Disaster at the Closing of the Dutch Golden Age, 1672-1764."
  • Joshua Nygren defended his dissertation, ""Soil, Water, and the State: The Conservation-Industrial Complex and American Agriculture since 1920," in December, 2014 with honors.
  • María Gabriela Torres Montero defended her dissertation, "Nature and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Mexico: The Sociedad Mexicana de Historia Natural, 1868-1914," in October, 2014.
  • Ed Russell was recently appointed Vice President of the American Historical Association, Research Division.
  • Ed Russell and Sally K. Fairfax recently published their edited volume CQ Guide to U.S. Environmental Policy (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2014)
  • Sara Gregg received a Fellowship to the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich, Germany for 2014-2015 (deferred)
  • Greg Cushman's newest book, Guano and the Opening of the Pacific World: A Global Ecological Historyrecently won the following awards: the Jerry Bentley Prize for best book in world history, American Historical Association, Jan. 2015; the Murdo J. MacLeod Book Prize, Latin American & Caribbean Section, Southern Historical Assoc., Nov. 2014; and the Henry A. Wallace Award for best book on agricultural history outside the United States, Agricultural History Society, June 2014.​
  • Greg Cushman was recently featured on the Lawrence local television program "The Not So Late Show" speaking about his recent book Guano and the Opening of the Pacific World 
  • Josh Nygren published his article "A Producers' Republic: Rural Zoning, Land Use, and Citizenship in the Great Lakes Cutover, 1920-1940" in the Michigan Historical Review (Spring, 2014). His article "In Pursuit of Conservation Reform: Social Darwinism, the Agricultural Ladder, and the Lessons of European Tenancy" won the 2013 Everett E. Edwards Award for best article submitted to the journal Agricultural History by a graduate student and will be published in the Winter, 2015 edition.

 


 
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